Part 36 Pointers

Matthew Rose gives an overview of key points for Part 36. Lockdown tip: remember Part 36 follows the rules of service, so make sure you get agreement to serve offers by email.

Matthew Rose is a Solicitor on the Costs team at Clarion Solicitors. Contact him at matthew.rose@clarionsolicitors.com or on 0113 222 3248.

New Rules for Damages Based Agreements

In October 2019 proposals to reform the Damages Based Agreement (DBA) Regulations were published. Here I give a brief rundown of what the new proposals mean.

The Law Society has recently published a more detailed analysis of the key points which can be viewed here.

Matthew Rose is a Solicitor in the Clarion Costs Team. You can contact him on 0113 222 3248 or by email to matthew.rose@clarionsolicitors.com.

 

 

Coronavirus Update: Bar Council guidance on attendance at Court

The Bar Council has today given further guidance to its members that advocates should not attend hearings in person unless they are “genuinely urgent” and cannot be done remotely. However, it is anticipated that such a hearing will be a rare occurrence.

My standing advice is that where a hearing is listed, practitioners should contact the court as soon as possible and ask for guidance. I recently wrote to the County Court at Huddersfield and asked what procedures are currently in place; I received a response today stating that “all hearings will be adjourned: you will be contacted before the hearing”.

The situation continues to develop rapidly and therefore it is likely that the position in relation to hearings will change.

Matthew Rose is a solicitor in the Clarion Costs Department. You can contact him on 0113 222 3248 or by email at Matthew.Rose@clarionsolicitors.com.

Designated Civil Judge for Cheshire and Merseyside issues guidance for business in the Cheshire and Merseyside Courts

His Honour Judge Graham Wood has released guidance for all business conducted in the Liverpool and Chester County Courts and the Cheshire and Merseyside Cluster for Civil Work.

  1. Small claims track hearings.

All small claims track lists will be vacated until after 4th May, and orders will be sent out accordingly. It is considered that it would not be practicable to have these matters, in most of which the parties are unrepresented, proceed by telephone or remotely. Because of the way these cases are listed, there is likely to be significant personal contact between individuals and court staff, which is not justified in the circumstances. New dates will be sent out in due course.

  1. Fast track and multitrack trials and other open court face to face hearings such as injunctions and committals

The default position for all fast track and multi-track cases will be that they shall be vacated for a minimum period of four weeks from 25th March 2020. The position will be reviewed for the period thereafter. It is considered that insufficient safeguards can be introduced for the majority of trial work to ensure social distancing and negligible contact with staff and other court users. As it is the default position, it will be clear from orders vacating, (a judicial order subject to CPR 3.3 (5) ) that parties can apply for a variation and the reinstating of the trial. However it is only in the most exceptional cases that any such order will be varied and it will be incumbent on the parties to demonstrate that safety can be assured and social distancing preserved and that continuation of the trial is consensual between all parties and advocates.

Trials listed within a window up to 1st June will be vacated and parties will be notified of the new trial window in due course. Any payment of the hearing fee will also be deferred to a later date.

Committals (including arrest cases for ASBI and gang breaches) and injunctions will remain listed in court but may be subject to vacating after assessment by a judge.

  1. Appeals

Oral renewals will be heard from 30th March remotely. Litigants in person will be given a number to dial into, in the absence of any representative, but if a party is legally represented it is expected that the responsibility will lie with the lawyer to set up as usual. Arrangements are being put in place to have full appeals proceed remotely in straightforward cases, although it is likely that more complicated heavy documented appeals will be stood out.

  1. CCMCs and Chambers lists

This will cover interim applications, pre-trial reviews, applications to set aside etc, as well as costs and case management. All cases will now proceed by remote hearing. Parties are encouraged to cooperate in the mode of hearing (usually telephone) and the usual arrangements for telephone hearings will apply, with one party being directed to organise. It should be borne in mind that litigants in person are not to be excluded from the telephone hearing process, and lawyers are encouraged to ensure that unrepresented parties are aware of the process involved and can properly participate. If both parties are unrepresented, they will be contacted by the court with a number to dial into. There is active consideration being given to a new telephone system for hearings from BT which can be controlled by the judge, and full details will be supplied when this is up and running (BT Meetme).

  1. Stage 3 hearings and disposals (back-to-back lists)

It is proposed that these should now proceed by a remote method, preferably by Skype. There is to be liaison with local practitioners as to the processes involved, including the filing of the necessary documents to enable consideration by the judge, but the intention will be that where cases are block-listed they can be assigned to a particular judge (say 4 or 5 cases per hour) and counsel can still enter the video-conference as and when it is necessary to consider a particular case. This will still enable counsel to attend on other Skype conferences, in a virtual courtroom, in much the same way as happens now in actual courtrooms. These procedures will require the cooperation of practitioners to work efficiently. Current technical difficulties are being ironed out.

  1. PCOL, mortgage and possession cases (both private and social)

Whilst some housing work will continue (e.g. urgent ASBI injunctions, committals etc) in accordance with national guidance the default position will be that all possession claims and evictions will be vacated and postponed for at least three months. The current working date is 19th June, although this may change.

  1. Oral examinations, attachment of earnings and third party debt orders

Oral examinations will be vacated. It is clearly inappropriate for members of staff and members of the public to be in such close association. Fresh dates will be provided after 19th June. Consideration is being given to moving attachments of earnings hearings and third party debt order hearings to a remote method, but this has not yet been finalised. For the time being, parties should assume that these cases will continue as before.

  1. Insolvency and BPC work

It is intended that separate guidance will be issued in relation to the BPC (mainly Chancery and TCC) work which is conducted in Liverpool, in line with national and regional guidance for these cases, which is likely to involve a substantial amount of remote hearing. Please consult that guidance when available. In relation to corporate and personal insolvency, consideration is being given to finding alternative methods of dealing with these cases, but for the time being please assume that they will continue as face-to-face hearings until notified to the contrary.

  1. Infant Approvals

In the short-term infant approval hearings are being dealt with as telephone hearings. Parties should be aware of the need to ensure the judge has sight of the birth certificate and the CFO form by filing them at court 3 days prior to the hearing. However, over coming weeks in Liverpool at least I propose to adopt the new Birkenhead practice of having these hearings proceed as “paper hearings” to minimise the strain on the telephone capacity.

  1. Other matters

I am conscious that this is not a comprehensive list of all matters which proceed in the Liverpool and Chester civil courts at present and that there are various species of case, the method of hearing of which has yet to be resolved, and which will depend upon a number of circumstances. Both I and other senior judges are happy to receive representations about the best method of proceeding in the current climate. After all, we are all on a learning curve. Please send any suggestions my Diary Manager, Alison Blunsden, at alison.blunsden@justice.gov.uk.

Coronavirus Update: Attendance at Court and “Key Worker” status

The Bar Council has recently announced new guidance for barristers on attendance at Court and on “Key Worker” status. 

Attending Court

HMCTS has informed the bar council that “listing officers are working urgently to let people know what is happening but a good ‘rule of thumb’ is that if the trial is underway, the default is to attend unless the court tells you otherwise, but if the trial has not started the default is to stay away unless told to attend”.

HMCTS is advising in the Magistrates Court, that ‘it is best to attend if you are expecting to work today’.

In my view, where a hearing of any kind is currently listed, practitioners should keep in regular contact with the court to confirm the status of the hearing. For more information about standing advice in relation to hearings as well as some hints for working from home and dealing with the practicalities of hearings you can view my Coronavirus Update video here posted Friday 20th March 2020:

Up-to-the-minute guidance is available from the Courts on the HMCTS website.

Key worker status updated

The government has acknowledged that legal practitioners are fundamental to the running of the justice system and The Department for Education has just issued further guidance on which legal practitioners come within the limited category of key workers whose children may continue to attend school or nursery whilst they deliver essential services:

  • Advocates (including solicitor advocates) required to appear before a court or tribunal (remotely or in person), including prosecutors;
  • Other legal practitioners required to support the administration of justice including duty solicitors (police station and court) and barristers, solicitors, legal executives, paralegals and others who work on imminent or ongoing court or tribunal hearings;
  • Solicitors acting in connection with the execution of wills, and
  • Solicitors and barristers advising people living in institutions or deprived of their liberty.

Practitioners are responsible for deciding for themselves whether they fall within these categories.

Clarion continues to be open for business, with some changes in working practices to ensure that the safety of our clients and employees remains our top priority. Matthew Rose is a solicitor and you can contact him on 0113 222 3248 or by email to Matthew.Rose@clarionsolicitors.com

Coronavirus: Working Under Lockdown

Coronavirus has caused widespread disruption. This brief update lets you know the Courts’ current approach, and how you can work effectively under lockdown.

Further information and our newsletter containing an explanation of how to sign documents electronically can be found here

Matthew Rose is a Solicitor in the Costs team. You can contact him on 0113 222 3248. Clarion Solicitors remains open for business as normal, with enhanced processes to ensure the safety of our clients and staff.

 

INTEREST IS NOT PAYABLE ON AN ADDITIONAL AMOUNT AWARDED UNDER CPR 36.17(4)(d)

Where the Court awards an “additional amount” under CPR 36.17(4)(d) as a claimant / receiving party beating its own Part 36 offer, the additional amount will not attract “enhanced” interest under CPR 36.17(4)(a).

In FZO -v- Adams & Anor [2019] EWHC 1286 (QB) the court allowed an additional amount under CPR 36.17(4)(d), but held that interest under CPR 36.17(4)(a) – enhanced interest at 10% above base rate – was not payable on that amount. Giving judgment, Mrs Justice Cutts found that the construction of CPR 36.17(4)(d) was that the “additional amount” was not a “sum awarded” and that the words “additional” and “amount” mean that the award is in addition to the enhanced interest at CPR 36.17(4)(a).

It should be noted that CPR 36.17(4) states that where the claimant has beaten their own offer the court “…must, unless it considers it unjust to do so, order that the claimant is entitled to…” and thereafter lists the consequences (enhanced interest, additional amount, etc). This does not appear to accord with the judge’s acceptance of the defendant’s submission that the additional amount is not a “sum awarded”. On the construction of CPR 36.17(4) it seems that those consequences are sums awarded by the court, albeit they are sums which the court is bound to award save where it considers it to be unjust.

Notwithstanding, the second strand of the judge’s reasoning appears wholly sound insofar as the “additional amount” is additional to the other consequences and therefore not itself subject to those consequences.

However, practitioners should be aware that this applies only to interest arising under CPR 36.17(4)(a). As the additional amount is a sum which a party is ordered to pay, and (as above) is a sum which the court orders that party to pay, it is a judgment debt and thus interest will, in the author’s opinion, arise under section 17 of the Judgments Act 1838 at the rate of 8% should payment not be made within the prescribed period (14 days pursuant to CPR 40.11 unless otherwise ordered)

Matthew Rose is an Associate in the Costs and Litigation Funding Department at Clarion Solicitors. You can contact him at matthew.rose@clarionsolicitors.com and 0113 222 3248. You can contact the Clarion Costs Team on 0113 246 0622.