The Disclosure Pilot Scheme – what roles do costs estimates and precedent H costs budgets have?

Details of the disclosure pilot scheme are now available on the MOJ website, with a large focus of the scheme centring around saving costs – accurate costs estimates are essential (PRACTICE DIRECTION 51U – DISCLOSURE PILOT FOR THE BUSINESS AND PROPERTY COURTS).

In terms of costs, the pilot scheme reveals that costs estimates are now required to support different disclosure proposals; costs estimates of the intended disclosure exercise are required; estimating the costs of disclosure can be deferred until after the precedent H costs budget; costs don’t necessarily follow the event and be prepared for adverse costs orders being made. Be ready to be able to justify any estimates at a hearing and ensure that the estimates are accurate enough to be transferred across to the precedent H costs budget. Please see below some important paragraphs of the pilot scheme that relate to costs and estimates:

Costs don’t necessarily follow the event.

Para 9.9 – In an appropriate case, the court may order that the question of which party bears the costs of disclosure is to be given separate consideration at a later stage rather than the costs being treated automatically as costs in the case;

Para 10.3 – The parties’ obligation to complete, seek to agree and update the Disclosure Review Document is ongoing. If a party fails to co-operate and constructively to engage in this process the other party or parties may apply to the court for an appropriate order at or separately from the case management conference, and the court may make any appropriate order including the dismissal of any application for Extended Disclosure and/or the adjournment of the case management conference with an adverse order for costs.

Costs estimates are required to support different disclosure proposals.

10.6 – Having agreed the List of Issues for Disclosure and exchanged proposals on Model(s) for Extended Disclosure, the parties should prepare and exchange drafts of Section 2 of the Disclosure Review Document (including costs estimates of different proposals, and where possible estimates of likely amount of documents involved) as soon as reasonably practicable and in any event not later than 14 days before the case management conference.

Costs estimates of the intended disclosure exercise are required.

22.1 – The parties are required to provide an estimate of what they consider to be the likely costs of giving the disclosure proposed by them in the Disclosure Review Document, and the likely volume of documents involved, in order that a court may consider whether such proposals on disclosure are reasonable and proportionate (as defined in paragraph 6.4). These estimated costs may be used by the court in the cost budgeting process.

Estimating the costs of disclosure can be deferred until after the precedent H costs budget.

22.2 – In cases where the cost budgeting scheme applies, if it is not practical to complete the disclosure section of Form H in relation to disclosure prior to the court making an order in relation to disclosure at the case management conference, the parties may notify the court that they have agreed to postpone completion of that section of Form H until after the case management conference. If they have agreed to postpone they must complete the disclosure section within such period as is ordered by the court after an order for disclosure has been made at the case management conference. Where possible the court will then consider (and if appropriate, approve) that part of the cost budget without an oral hearing.

If the approach to Extended Disclosure is not fully agreed, the parties should be ready to provide more detailed information at the CMC as to how their global estimates were arrived at and the impact upon them of particular requests for Extended Disclosure.

Any questions? Please contact me at sue.fox@clarionsolicitors.com or call me on 0113 336 3389.

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